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Our Mission
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Our Mission

The Museum of Peoples and Cultures exists to serve the academic mission of BYU and care for the anthropological, archaeological, and ethnographic collections in the custody of the University.

The Museum of Peoples and Cultures is BYU’s Teaching Museum, inspiring students to life-long learning and service and mentoring them in collections-focused activities that reinforce BYU ideals of education as spiritually strengthening, intellectually enlarging, and character building. These activities concurrently serve the scholarly community, the LDS community, and/or the general public and aspire to the highest standards of stewardship and public trust.

The Museum supports this mission by:

  • Collecting, preserving, and caring for material objects that document the diversity of human experiences and reflect the multi-faceted fabric of the world’s cultures past and present;
  • Providing a professional learning environment for BYU students through a broad range of instruction in both formal and informal settings; through programs that enable student participation; and through example and role-modeling;
  • Facilitating teaching and research on peoples and cultures by BYU faculty, staff, students, and by members of the scholarly community in peer institutions;
  • Creating new knowledge through scholarly research including field activities, research, and exhibitions; and,
  • Educating museum visitors about peoples and cultures as appropriate to the Museum’s holdings and collecting scope.

Contact Us

Front Office: (801) 422-0020
Email: mpc@byu.edu
Education Office: (801) 422-0022

Mailing Address:
Museum of Peoples and Cultures B67
701 E. University Parkway
Provo, UT 84602

Physical Address:
Museum of Peoples and Cultures
2201 N. Canyon Road
Provo, UT 84602

Brief History of Museums at BYU

Lewis Building
Lewis Building

Museum efforts at Brigham Young Academy began as early as 1879, when James E. Talmage was appointed curator of the Brigham Young Academy Museum. We know from his notes that the museum collected natural history, geological, and archaeological objects. By the 1930s, BYU’s museum collections were located in Room D of the Education Building (now the Provo City Library). Over time, the original museum collections were split up. The University now has four museums - the Paleontology Museum, the Museum of Art, the Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum, and the Museum of Peoples and Cultures (MPC). The MPC is Brigham Young University’s archaeological and anthropological museum.

Brief History of the Museum of Peoples and Cultures

Brigham Young Academy
Brigham Young Academy

BYU’s archaeology department was established in 1946. In part, the formation of the department and the subsequent field work necessitated the opening of a separate archaeology museum. In those early years, the archaeology museum was located in the lower floor of the Eyring Science Center. In 1961 it was moved to the bottom floor of the Maeser Building, and in 1981 it moved to Allen Hall and was given its current name.
Previous even to Allen Hall, the roots of today’s collections were stored and displayed in the Lewis Building on Provo Center Street (no longer standing), the Academy Building on University Avenue (now the Provo City Library), and the Maeser Builing on “campus hill.”

Maeser Building
Maeser Building

The museum has continued to grow and improve over the years. Recent awards include a State Certificate Award for Excellence in All Areas of Museum Operations as well as the 2011 Award of Merit from the American Association for State and Local History. Since 2000, the MPC has received over $250,000 in Federal and State grants for various research projects. In the same time period, $1.5 million in object and cash donations have significantly increased the quality of the collections.
All exhibits at the MPC are designed and installed by students in BYU’s museum certificate program. Public programs, like our popular date nights and FHEs, are also planned by student employees and volunteers.

Allen Hall Building History

Allen Hall
Allen Hall

Allen Hall was built in the late 1930s as a men’s dormitory. During World War II it became women’s housing. In the 1960s the building was adapted for use as a Language Training Mission (a pre-cursor to the MTC). This varied history is evident in the structure of the building. The galleries are located in what used to be the common and dining rooms when the building was student housing. The classroom was the kitchen, and the majority of offices were dorm rooms. The museum occupied the building since 1981 until it moved in 2015 to our current location on Canyon Road.

Newsroom


newsroom 1

Museum Camp in Daily Herald

BYU's Museum Camp highlighted in a Daily Herald article titled, "BYU's Museum Camp lets students go behind the scenes at its museums."

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Museum of Peoples and Cultures

Piecing Together Paquime

The museum recently opened its exhibition on Paquime culture, specifically featuring the extensive pottery collection from Casas Grandes.

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newsroom 3

Nauvoo Calls for BYU Archaeologists

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints asked BYU Archaeologists to excavate to home of Edward Hunter, a prominent historical figure of the LDS church.

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Selections from the Collection: Polynesia

Passports to Polynesia Welcomes Dozens of Presenters

The MPC hosted dozens of presenters representing the island nations of Polynesia in an interactive experience titled "Passports to Polynesia".
Read more about the experience in this article from the Daily Herald.

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The Museum of Peoples and Cultures recently made the Daily Herald's Ultimate Winter Bucket List. To read more about the museum and see the rest of the list, click here.

Newsletter

Every month the Museum sends out an electronic newsletter highlighting upcoming events, programs, and other exciting news. To be added onto our email list and receive our monthly emails, please submit your email below .

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